Class Actions

Gordon Law Group is presently investigating violations at a number of employers across the country. If you’d like to speak with one of our attorneys about any matter, please contact us. We have experience working with employees in a diverse number of industries. Click on the links below to view a sample of some of the cases we’re investigating.

Working in construction, whether or not you are represented by a union, requires a lot of hours and a lot of travel between sites – often totaling more than 40 hours per week. Working in construction also offers opportunities to work on prevailing rate jobs – on projects for cities and towns, such as road construction, water works, sidewalks and sewers. But many companies pay their workers straight wages for all hours worked, refuse to pay for any work not performed on-site, or pay workers at rates lower than the amounts required under the prevailing wage laws.
Our firm has extensive experience with construction workers. If you worked on a prevailing rate job or if your company refused to pay you for all hours worked anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Wait staff, servers, bartenders, hotel employees, banquet workers and baggage handlers often receive tips as part of their work. But when the company takes those tips or permits managers to share in the pool, the server gets pinched.
Customers leave tips for the serving employee. Often servers who work together choose to pool their tips so everyone shares in the fruits of a shift. But sometimes, employers take advantage of those pools, requiring a house-split (where the house takes a certain percentage off-the-top) or requiring employees include managers in the pool. This is in direct violation of the Tips Laws.
Our firm has extensive experience with the Tips Laws and servers. If you worked as a tipped server anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Typically among the hardest working person in a mortgage operation, Underwriters are rarely paid overtime for their work. Most often Underwriters are salaried employees working 45-60 hours per week.
But title alone does not justify the exemption, and most of these employees should be paid on an hourly basis, with time-and-a-half for overtime. That’s because most Underwriters rarely supervise 2 or more people, rarely have the authority to hire and fire employees, and rarely have the authority to make independent decisions over anything of significance. One might assume that the decision to grant or deny loans is significant, but most often those decisions follow highly specific guidelines.
Our firm has extensive experience with Underwriters. If you worked in one of these positions anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Working for a staffing agency requires a lot of hours – often more than 40 hours per week, with a lot of expenses and a lot of travel time between jobs. Many companies tell their employees that there’s no pay for travel between job sites, no pay for set-up time and no reimbursement for expenses such as uniforms, equipment and travel. And many companies refuse to share with their employees the tips received, calling those tips part of a service charge. Most employees think that because their agency insists on the rules, that the employees must be wrong.
Our firm has extensive experience with staffing agency employees. If you worked for a staffing agency at anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Independent contractors in many industries – such as construction, computer programming, package delivery and maintenance – often work the same number of hours as their “employee” counter-parts, but for less pay and no benefits.
The independent contractor laws are very strict, and many employers misclassify their workers. Our firm has extensive experience with misclassified workers. If you’ve worked as an independent contractor anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Field service technicians often work significantly more than 40 hours per week, with plenty of expenses and travel time between jobs. Most employers pay their field service technicians on a per job basis or a salary basis. Many companies tell their employees that there’s no pay for travel between job sites, no pay for set-up time, no pay for overtime and no reimbursement for expenses such as uniforms, equipment and travel.
But many employees in these positions are entitled to overtime, reimbursement of their business expenses, and pay for travel time.
Our firm has extensive experience with field service technicians. If you worked in one of those positions at anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Working in a call-center, whether in sales or support, requires a lot of hours – often more than 40 hours per week. But many companies pay their call-center employees a salary, and deny them pay for their overtime. Most employees think that because they’re on salary that means they’re not entitled to overtime. With call-center employees, though, this often is just not true.
Frequently, employers attempt to cover up these unlawful practices by
1. Paying their employees a salary, without tracking hours or paying for overtime, even when the employer knows the employees work more than 40 hours per week.
2. Misclassifying their employees as independent contractors and paying them a flat fee for the week.
3. Instructing employees to falsify time sheets and record only 40 hours every week, despite the fact that they worked more.
4. Instruct employees to eat lunch at their desks, but then failing to count the time as “working time.”
5. Paying employees by the call, without regard to hours worked.
Our firm has extensive experience with call-center employees. If you worked in a call-center anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Vehicle drivers – whether in field service, delivery or operations – often work well more than 40 hours per week, with plenty of expenses and travel time between jobs. Most employers pay their drivers on a salary basis. Many companies tell their employees that there’s no pay for travel between job sites, no pay for set-up time, no pay for overtime and no reimbursement for expenses such as uniforms, equipment and travel.
But, if you drive a vehicle rated under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight, you may be entitled to overtime. You may also be entitled to reimbursement of business expenses and pay for travel time.
Our firm has extensive experience with vehicle drivers. If you’ve driven for your employer at anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

Often the hardest working person in any retail organization is the Assistant Store Manager. ASM’s are typically salaried employees working 45-60 hours per week and denied overtime by the employer because of their fancy title.
But title alone does not justify the exemption, and most of these employees should be paid on an hourly basis, with time-and-a-half for overtime. That’s because most Assistant Store Managers (sometimes called Shift Supervisors) rarely supervise 2 or more people, rarely have the authority to hire and fire employees, and rarely have the authority to make independent decisions over anything of significance.
Our firm has extensive experience with Assistant Store Managers. If you worked in one of these positions anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.

People who work in computers – whether as help-desk support, software programmers or in data entry – often work more than 40 hours per week. But many companies pay their computer workers a salary, and deny them pay for their overtime. Most employees think that because they’re on salary that means they’re not entitled to overtime. With many of these workers, though, this often is just not true.
Frequently, employers attempt to cover up these unlawful practices by:
1. Paying their computer workers a salary, without tracking hours or paying for overtime, even when the employer knows the employees work more than 40 hours per week.
2. Misclassifying their employees as independent contractors and paying them a flat fee for the week, without regard to hours worked.
3. Instructing employees to falsify time sheets and record only 40 hours every week, despite the fact that they worked more.
4. Instructing employees to eat lunch at their desks, but then failing to count the time as “working time.”
5. Paying employees by the project, without regard to hours worked.
Although certain “computer professionals” are exempt under the overtime laws, those categories are limited to individuals whose primary duty consists of: (a) the application of systems analysis techniques and procedures, including consulting with users, to determine hardware, software or system functional specifications; (b) the design, development, documentation, analysis, creation, testing or modification of computer systems or programs, including prototypes, based on and related to user or system design specifications; (c) the design, documentation, testing, creation or modification of computer programs related to machine operating systems; or (d) a combination of the aforementioned duties, the performance of which requires the same level of skills.
In addition, those “computer professionals” must be paid a salary of at least $455 per week or be compensated at an hourly rate of no less than $27.63 per hour.
Our firm has extensive experience with computer workers. If you worked in the IT or computer field anytime during the last three years, please contact us for a free consultation to discuss your claim.